Montesano & Tallarico, D.V.M., LLP

305 Old Willets Path
Smithtown, NY 11787

(631)366-0003

montallequine.com

Deworming Protocol

*The most effective deworming program individualizes deworming and identifies the parasites that put your horse at risk.

Step 1- Establish Baseline Egg Counts. A fecal egg count (FEC) should be performed to determine your horse's parasite status. This will establish weather your current deworming program is working properly. FECs should be evaluated annually. Horses with a higher risk of parasite exposure should have more frequent FECs.
 
Step 2- Measure Shedding Levels. FECs should be done on the whole herd to determine the level of parasite shedding.Assessing the shedding level of individuals within the herd identifies the horses that pose the greatest risk of exposing others to parasite infection and provides information needed to form a tailored strategy. Less than 200 eggs per gram may indicate low risk, while greater than 500 eggs per gram may indicate a horse is at a higher risk of spreading infection.
 
Step 3- Know Your Variables. Risk evaluation is integral to successful deworming strategies. Before deworming, check with us to analyze your horse's parasite exposure risk. All horses carry unique risk factors that affect their vulnerability to parasites.

Step 4- Determine Your Horses ID. We will analyze the data collected from your horse, herd and farm to customize an easy to follow plan that fits the individual needs of your horse. No matter what plan you follow, it's important to monitor the success with regular FEC's and risk factor evaluations. This will help detect things like parasite resistance. If resistance is suspected, we may perform a Fecal Egg Reduction Test (FERT) to evaluate the efficacy of individual anthelmintic products and inform whether change is needed.

 

Daily Deworming Protocol:
 
Deworm January and June with Ivermectin/praziquantel combination(Equimax) and keep horse on a daily dewormer, pyrantel pamoate (Strongid 2 x).